Interviews

‘It was by living out the theory that we enraged so many others’: An Interview with Michael Gottlieb

When we walk those same streets these days, me with friends of mine from those older days, and we remember running in these streets in our youth, when the streets were empty, and dirty and dangerous, but mostly empty, we do ask ourselves if perhaps we had some role, however tiny, in turning these neighborhoods into what they are now.

Interviews

‘Mythmaking, second-hand information, and outright lies’: An Interview with Sarah Sweeney

Nonfiction writer Sarah Sweeney was new to me, but as soon as I read an essay’s opening line of “I never planned to throw my tampon on a stranger’s car,” I knew that her writing was something that I would enjoy immensely. Her most recent collection, Tell Me If You’re Lying, adds up to a… Continue reading ‘Mythmaking, second-hand information, and outright lies’: An Interview with Sarah Sweeney

Interviews

“Hope and Anchor”: An Interview with Joshua Corey

Poetry can inspire us, confuse us, and excite neurons in the human brain to produces new thoughts and ideas. Joshua Corey’s newest collection of poems, The Barons, does all of these things and more, addressing the turmoil in America since 9/11: war, fear, and political upheaval both in the United States and abroad. Dark, complex,… Continue reading “Hope and Anchor”: An Interview with Joshua Corey

Interviews

“To blossom or diverge or dissipate or redirect”: An Interview with Brian Clements

To some, prose poetry may seem foreign and hard to pin down. The form walks the murky waters between reading surrealist poetry. To make matters more confusing, there is no consensus on exactly what defines the form. But Brian Clements’ new collection helps to clarify matters. A Book of Common Rituals relates readers to day-to-day activities… Continue reading “To blossom or diverge or dissipate or redirect”: An Interview with Brian Clements

Interviews

“What I am is a militant translator”: An Interview with Mitchell Abidor

Emmanuel Bove’s harrowing 1932 novella, A Raskolnikoff, was released to the American public late this year. With Mitchell Abidor’s stunning translation—for which he has won the 2014 Hemingway Translation Grant— comes a new hope for one of literature’s forgotten sons. Abidor is the right translator for the job. A contributing writer at Jewish Currents and… Continue reading “What I am is a militant translator”: An Interview with Mitchell Abidor

Interviews

“I don’t believe in rules or steps”: An Interview with Lavinia Greenlaw

Lavinia Greenlaw is a celebrated and highly accomplished author, winner of numerous awards in poetry, most recently the Whitbread Poetry Award and the T.S. Eliot Prize, her books include the poetry collection Minsk, The Casual Perfect, and the memoir The Importance of Music to Girls. Her newest, A Double Sorrow, revisits Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and… Continue reading “I don’t believe in rules or steps”: An Interview with Lavinia Greenlaw